Super-Immune Kids: Four Tips For The New School Year

Super-Immune Kid
Here are my four top tips for helping your children to stay healthy and avoid illnesses in the new school year.

The foods that make kids the sickest are sugar and dairy.  

1.  Avoid dairy

If you can possibly raise them without milk products, you will prevent the most common mucus conditions, especially colds and ear infections.  Milk is a great mucus producer;  bacteria love living in it, and casein, the protein in milk, is commonly used in laboratories to set up bacterial cultures.  Cheese is just as much of a problem, and yogurt is little better.  And it’s not because of the fat – in fact, butter does not bring on infections, according to my observations – it is the protein and the calcium, which in cow’s milk are intended to help baby cows become big cows (or steer), and are excessive for humans.

2.  Don’t reward them with sugar

If you can avoid giving your kids sugared foods – including sugared breakfast cereals, cookies, cake, candy, and ice cream – you will allow their immune systems to do a better job of keeping them healthy.  Sugar is known to depress the immune system, and what is worse, it is really addictive.  According to a recent study at the University of Bordeaux, France, it appears to be more addictive than cocaine.  I know that we tend to reward the children with sweet goodies, but that habit is perhaps best reconsidered – crayons, balloons, comic books or nuts and raisins might be a better idea for rewards.

3.  Give them lots of protein

To keep the kids healthy, they also need to eat sufficient protein (some in each meal, such as fish, chicken, meats, or beans and legumes), with lots of vegetables both cooked and raw, as well as good quality fats (extra virgin olive oil, coconut oil, organic butter).  See my post on protein breakfasts for more advice.

4.  Make sure they get plenty of rest

Most importantly, they need enough sleep and rest, which will allow their bodies and their brains to recuperate and restore, as well as grow.  Lack of sleep is one of the major causes of stress and illness.

So there you have it:  feed them well, keep them off the ice cream and sweets, and make sure they sleep enough, and they will avoid many illnesses.

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  • Lisa

    When you say dairy, do you really mean cow's milk? I read that goat's milk has a different kind of casein and therefore is less problematical – is it a viable substitute in moderation?? Thanks!

  • yes generally it means cow's milk because goat's and (sheep's) milk

    are easier to digest

  • Hi Dr. Lipman. What would you recommend as an alternative? My son can’t have cow’s milk (he vomits after drinking it which I think suggests a milk protein intolerance and not lactose intolerance – his dr.’s don’t know) and the pediatricians I’ve spoken to are at a loss on what to suggest as an alternative. After giving him soymilk for years, I read there are issues with the phytoestrogens. We’ve now switched to coconut milk, but it’s low in protein and calcium. He is 3 years old and loves to drink a “milk” type product. Also he is quite thin, 10% for his age group. I really appreciate any advice you can give me, Thanks so much for this web site! The information you provide is a godsend. I hope to visit your center some day!