Common Sleep Questions | Part 1
February 22

Sleeping Man After Eating + Drinking

Does what I eat or drink affect my sleep?

Definitely. Caffeine and alcohol are the two biggest culprits, but other substances may affect your sleep too.

Caffeine even in small doses blocks sleep neurotransmitters. If you have a problem with sleep, cut out coffee and any caffeinated beverages (even in the morning). Caffeine is not just in coffee. It’s in colas and other soft drinks, tea, even some herbal teas, chocolate and some medications (Anacin and Excedrin, for example). There’s even a little caffeine in decaffeinated coffee. Caffeine is a powerful stimulant with a half life typically of up to 7 hours. But for some people it may be much longer especially if you are taking the oral contraceptive, some medications, have liver problems or just getting older.

Alcohol has an initial sleep inducing effect, but when broken down by the body, it can lighten sleep and causes frequent and early awakening. Alcohol interacts with GABA receptors, blocking the brain’s oxygen sensors, cutting oxygen and complicating sleep conditions, particularly for sleep apnea. Habitual alcohol consumption just before bedtime can reduce it’s sleep-inducing effect, while its disruptive effects continue or even increase

Tobacco acts as a stimulant and blocks sleep neurotransmitters.

Many medications, such as antihistamines, diuretics, antipsychotics, antidepressants decongestants, asthma medications, and some blood pressure medicines, also cause sleeplessness. If you’re taking any necessary medication that interrupts your sleep, talk with your doctor about an alternative.
Certain foods can cause food reactions or sensitivities which can effect your sleep cycle.

Refined grains and sugars before bed can raise blood sugar and overstress the organs involved in hormone regulation throughout the body. This hormone roller coaster can affect sleep cycles by waking you up at odd times during sleep as the hormone levels fluctuate.

Too many liquids in the 4 hrs before bed can effect you too. Try not to drink too much before turning in.

So eliminating caffeine, alcohol, sugar and refined grains and the common food allergens, gluten and dairy is a good place to start.

Working In Bed

What do I do if I can’t fall asleep?

Try some Melatonin. Melatonin can be helpful when you can’t fall asleep. Try taking nutrients that calm the body and mind. Look for a formula that has some of the following calming amino acids, L Theanine (100mg-300mg), 5 HTP (50-100mg), GABA (Gamma-aminobutyric acid) (200-500mg), and possibly lemon balm (Melissa officinalis), which also has a sedative effect. Taking the minerals, calcium and magnesium at night is also helpful.

Create an electronic sundown. By 10pm, stop sitting in front of a computer screen (or TV screen) and switch off all electronic devices. It is too stimulating to the brain and it will take longer to fall asleep.

Prepare for bed. Try dimming the lights an hour or more before going to bed, take a warm bath, listen to calming music or do some restorative yoga or relaxation exercises. Just as you would clean a cluttered room, put things away (mentally and physically) that will distract you from going to sleep

Clock

What to do if I wake up at 2 or 3 o’clock in the morning?

Try taking nutrients that calm the body and mind. Look for a formula that has some of the following calming amino acids, L Theanine (100mg-300mg), 5 HTP (50-100mg), GABA (Gamma-aminobutyric acid) (200-500mg), and possibly lemon balm (Melissa officinalis), which also has a sedative effect. Taking the minerals, calcium and magnesium at night is also helpful.

Create a regular routine. Getting up and going to bed around the same time, even on weekends, is the most important thing you can do to establish good sleep habits. Our bodies thrive on regularity and a consistent sleep schedule is the best reinforcement for the body’s internal clock.

Waking and sleeping at set times reinforces a consistent sleep rhythm and reminds the brain when to release sleep and wake hormones, and more importantly, when not to.

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  • http://www.nuhealthstrategies.com/ chris

    Great suggestions but the problem with taking melatonin, you shut down your body's own natural production of melatonin by causing atrophy of the pineal gland.

  • http://www.franklipman.com franklipman

    Chris
    Taking Melatonin in low doses, 1/2mg -2mg for short periods can help regulate sleep rhythms and should not shut down your body's own production of melatonin
    One love
    Frank

  • http://www.nuhealthstrategies.com/ chris

    Great suggestions but the problem with taking melatonin, you shut down your body's own natural production of melatonin by causing atrophy of the pineal gland.

  • http://www.franklipman.com franklipman

    Chris
    Taking Melatonin in low doses, 1/2mg -2mg for short periods can help regulate sleep rhythms and should not shut down your body's own production of melatonin
    One love
    Frank

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  • Carol Keith

    Great thing you share your article, the informations were pretty useful for the readers. 5-HTP is really helpful for those who have sleep problems and depression. You are good, doctor! Keep it up.

    Carol Keith,
    SAM-e
    WholeHealth

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  • fay

    why does time go so slow for me while sleep?!!
    it feels as if every hour is like 3 hours…
    sleeping feels annoying.

  • Poyye

    Loved your sleep article on “wellness” but couldn’t find a place to make a comment. I don’t have a problem getting to sleep or waking up during the night but must force myself to wake up and get up in the morning. My dreams I think are what are bothering me. They are in color, I have at least one per night and they are very active dreams of doing things that are exciting or dangerous or fearfull. Sometimes I wake up and go back to sleep and the dream continues.
    Please tell me how to stop dreaming!