Category: Digestion

What most people don’t realize is that gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction or digestive problems can be the underlying issue for many seemingly unrelated problems–that is, conditions where the symptoms are not localized to the GI tract. Some skin conditions such as eczema, certain types of arthritis, some types of autoimmune diseases, migraine headaches, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia and many non-specific symptoms may have their root cause in digestive problems. This section will have blogs related to digestion and keeping the GI system functioning optimally.

Mindset for Maintenance: Getting Clean and Staying There

A gentle cleanse, like the Be Well Cleanse, is based on whole food meals and detoxifying smoothies and herbal supplements, not starvation. Cleaning up your diet and removing inflammatory foods based on the Cleanse diet allows your body to focus on rejuvenation, instead of repair, and can increase your energy, leaving you feeling revitalized. Glowing skin, fabulous moods, happy thoughts, and clearer thinking are all common results from the many groups that I’ve led through the Be Well Cleanse. However, sustaining this eating style and level of well-being can be a challenge once your cleanse is over.

Why Your Microbiome Is Important To Your Health

Many of my patients are shocked to learn that their microbome, this microscopic community that lives on and in them, plays such a vital role in their health and well-being, including their weight, their mental state, and their moods.

How I Discovered I Was Carbohydrate Intolerant

As a functional medicine physician, I’m used to helping my patients find the solutions to their health problems. When they start gaining weight and feeling fatigued, for example, I become a kind of detective, searching for clues as to how their diet and lifestyle might be interfering with their bodies need to achieve optimal function.

So, when I myself began putting on some extra pounds and struggling with late-afternoon exhaustion, I had to look at my own food choices.

The Skin and Gut Connection

The skin is your biggest organ and a window into what’s going on inside your body. Skin issues such as rosacea, eczema, acne, etc., are evidence that there’s something going on inside the gut. In layman terms: by fixing your gut, you can clear up your skin! It can be that simple.

8 Tips to Staying Regular While on Vacation

When we travel, our natural rhythms can get off schedule, and it’s common to experience constipation. Some people’s systems can tolerate going “off-track” while on vacation and still feel vibrant and fresh, while most of us just can’t handle it! I find that the closer we stick to our “normal” routine, the more normal our bowels can be. Here are six tips to follow if you find that staying regular while traveling is nearly impossible … because it is possible to feel great during your entire vacation!

Healthy Gut, Healthy Brain

Your brain’s health is dictated by what goes on in your gut. That’s right: What’s taking place in your intestines affects not only your brain’s daily functions, but also determines your risk for a number of neurological conditions in the future.

Interview with Dr. Robynne Chutkan, Author of The Microbiome Solution

The microbiome refers to all the bacteria, viruses, and fungi that live in or on your body – over 100 trillion microbes, plus their genes. More than 1 billion bacteria in just one drop of fluid in your colon alone. Your unique microbial footprint develops over your lifetime, and it reflects everything about you: your parents’ health, how and where you were born, what you’ve eaten (including whether your first sips were breast milk or formula), where you’ve lived, your occupation, personal hygiene, past infections, exposure to chemicals and toxins, medications, hormone levels.

Are the Bugs in Your Gut Making You Fat?

We are now learning that differences in the various species of bacteria that live within the intestines actually have a profound role in regulating metabolism. For example, researchers have demonstrated that when fecal material (rich in intestinal bacteria) from an obese human is transplanted into the colon of a normal laboratory rat, the animal will gain significant amounts of weight even though its diet remains unchanged.