Category: Children’s Health

Healthy School Lunch Ideas You Can Call Happy Meals

Although time-consuming and arguably tedious, packing a lunch for yourself or your children can be a powerful way to express your love and support and set a healthy intention for the day. At its core, preparing food for others is an act of love — and, as a parent, one of the most potent powers we possess is to support our children’s health. Embrace the chance to make the meal special, healthy and tasty and your children will feel the depth of your care for them.

19 Natural Sunscreens You Can Trust: A Consumer Guide

Does searching for natural sunscreen make you sweat? On the hunt for protection that doesn’t leave you greasy or glaring white? Tired of the kids running for cover when it’s time to apply sunscreen? Our helpful guide to choosing the safest natural sunscreen products that are also a pleasure to use makes buying this summertime staple a breeze.

Knowing the Difference Between Food Allergies and Food Sensitivities

Today, one in eleven children struggle with asthma, and one in four are affected by allergies. The incidence of allergy has increased significantly over the past two decades, and allergy to peanuts has more than quadrupled from 1997 to 2010. Approximately 30 million children – more than 1/3 of our kids – are affected by one of these four new childhood epidemics. This is not something we can just accept.

Baby’s First Finger Foods

I’ve had a lot of fun starting solid foods with my little one this year. She’s responded very well to healthy whole foods like sweet potato, acorn squash, broccoli, avocado, eggs, salmon and coconut oil. But I’ve noticed that when she goes on playdates with the other kids, she’s exposed to a lot of finger food like Cheerios, Goldfish and Puffs

Five Healthy Snacks for Your Child

It’s so easy to break open a bag of goldfish, pretzels or fruit snacks for your kids. The companies producing these products make it simple with individual servings, fun character themes and cute little shapes. But, guess what? These cute little snacks are full of chemicals and are made in laboratories. The list of ingredients is long and confusing, full of strange chemicals and carcinogens. With the onset of childhood obesity and developmental issues, it makes me wonder how these foods are affecting our children.

7 Strategies for Picky Eaters

We all want the best for our children – for their health, happiness and future. One of the best ways to support their growth and their future is through instilling good eating habits and providing them with a nutritious diet. None of this is easy with our busy schedules and our culture of processed food, unhealthy school lunches, and restaurant “kid menus” full of trans-fats and sugar.

Why You (Usually) Shouldn’t Treat a Fever

I grew up in a home without Tylenol, Motrin, or even aspirin in the medicine cabinet. My mother, a holistic health coach, never gave her kids fever-reducing medications when we were sick, and instead relied upon treatments that ranged from spoon-feeding us daikon-radish tea to placing warm onions over our ears.

Mom maintained that fevers serve an important function in the body’s immune response–and thus they should not be suppressed. At the time, conventional medical wisdom held that there was no downside to administering Advil or Tylenol as soon as the thermometer’s reading went about 98.6 degrees, so our pediatrician probably thought my mother was a crazy sadist.

Healthy Food Ideas For Your Baby

Letting your baby taste some food for the first time is such a special moment. To see the reaction on their cute little faces as they try to figure out what just happened is pure entertainment! I remember watching my own boy grabbing his pear and sweet potato sticks and chewing away on it with his bare gums.

So then comes the question too – what should I feed my baby?

In this context it’s important to mention that the WHO recommends exclusive breastfeeding until 5-6 months and supplemental breastfeeding (nursing as well as other foods) until 23 months.

Artificial Food Dyes and Kids: Not a Good Mix

A report released by the National Cancer Institute showed a 9.4% increase in childhood cancer between 1992 and 2007. And today, cancer is now the leading cause of death by disease in kids under the age of fifteen.

Correlation is not causation, but the escalating rates of conditions like cancer, diabetes and food allergies have a lot of parents paying attention to what is in their food. Some cancer doctors even call it the “doorknob syndrome.” A patient is diagnosed with cancer, spends hours in the office being walked through procedure options, then as they turn to go, with a hand on the doorknob, turn back into the office and ask, “Is there anything I could be doing differently with my diet?”