Category: Health & Wellness

I believe that there is a continuum between optimal health and disease. And what I see in my practice everyday is how different grades of sub-optimal functioning can appear at any point along it. For example, before your car’s brake pads give in and your brakes fail, years of wear and tear have been slowly eroding the pads. The same thing happens with our health. Before we develop a disease, or even symptoms, there have usually been months or years of progressive “wearing down” of optimal functioning. Our body has a large reserve, which it uses to maintain health, but it can be depleted or worn down over time. Only then do we experience disease, it doesn’t just happen out of the blue.

To use a natural metaphor, when a plant is sick or not doing well, it is crucial to look at the environment within which the plant is growing – what is the quality of the soil, is it getting enough nutrients, does it have enough sun or water, are roots or bugs from other plants impinging on its growth. This is exactly how I see our health and my role as a physician is to improve, promote and boost the bodies natural healing ability. This fosters immunity and resilience to illness, allowing us to truly blossom and experience good health.

My method is simple but effective: I remove what may be harming the body or preventing healing while at the same time replenishing it with what is needed. Unfortunately, most doctors do not see the health this way as we are trained to treat symptoms of disease as opposed to learning what keeps people healthy. We are taught crisis care medicine in hospitals and how to take care of acutely ill patients. But most of us are not sick enough to be in hospital and we have chronic conditions that are not dealt with well by this medical model. So we need to use Western Medicine wisely and appropriately, which often means looking beyond it, for solutions to our chronic and ongoing health problems.

5 Ways Not to Get Fat Over the Winter

The winter is rapidly approaching and, let’s face it, most of us tend to pack on a few extra pounds over the next few months. Here are five ways not to get fat and to stay on track (so you don’t have to start over in January):

How to Stick a Fork* in Antibiotic Resistance

What would happen if our children’s serious infections no longer responded to antibiotics? If an infection in the uterus of a mother who has recently given birth couldn’t be treated with antibiotics? If there were no longer a cure for meningitis, or any number of life threatening infections?

The magnitude of this reality is upon us as we enter into an era that is, according to major public health organizations such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization, defined by the global health crisis called antibiotic resistance.

Protein Smoothie for Thanksgiving Breakfast

We say it time and time again: Breakfast is the most important meal of the day! And this can be especially true during the holidays. A healthy and nourishing breakfast keeps you satisfied and energized, allowing you to really enjoy your Thanksgiving, which usually includes cooking a delicious meal, catching up with family, and resisting those tempting treats!

5 Tips to Reduce Thanksgiving Stress

Every year, at about this time, I can’t help but notice that the closer we get to Thanksgiving, the more uptight and anxious many people become. For some, it’s the stress of preparing the big turkey dinner, for others it’s the thought of traveling long distances during the heaviest travel period of the year, and then there’s the stress of the upcoming holiday season that kicks off moments after the Thanksgiving dishes are cleared.

How to Curb Emotional Eating
3 Questions to Ask Yourself

Our relationship to food is inextricably connected to our cultural and family traditions, our social lives and our daily routines. Whether fueled by boredom, anger, or sadness, it is all too easy to eat for reasons other than hunger — “emotional eating”— which can lead to weight gain, sugar addiction, digestive distress, and other problems.

What You Don’t Know About Unpronounceable Beauty Ingredients

You might assume that any ingredient with a long or difficult-to-pronounce name must be bad for you, but that’s a myth. Take a look at our product ingredient lists and you’ll likely find a few scary-sounding words—but, unlike what you may have been led to believe, that’s nothing to worry about. Why? Beautycounter uses the INCI (International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients) system, an internationally recognized way of standardizing labels on cosmetic products. It’s designed to help companies stay consistent, minimize language barriers, and provide consumers with greater transparency.

Which Almond Butter Tastes the Best?

Almond butter is stealing the spotlight these days as more and more people embrace healthy fats and proteins as the building blocks of their diets. And now more and more brands of nut butters are competing for space, crowding supermarket shelves in a bid for attention. But which is best and why?

The Lipman’s Favorite Thanksgiving Recipes

Thanksgiving is one of my favorite holidays. It’s a time to enjoy family and friends and to celebrate the bounty of seasonal food at this time of year. Over the years, I have gathered a handful of Thanksgiving recipes that have become my go-to for a delicious and, yes, healthy meal. So, in addition, to cooking the turkey on the outdoor grill and to simply roasting sweet potatoes (no marshmallows please), you’ll find these dishes on our Thanksgiving table.

8 Tips to Staying Regular While on Vacation

When we travel, our natural rhythms can get off schedule, and it’s common to experience constipation. Some people’s systems can tolerate going “off-track” while on vacation and still feel vibrant and fresh, while most of us just can’t handle it! I find that the closer we stick to our “normal” routine, the more normal our bowels can be. Here are six tips to follow if you find that staying regular while traveling is nearly impossible … because it is possible to feel great during your entire vacation!

The Functional-Medicine Matrix

Ten years ago, Jared was an overworked anesthesiologist who lived on fast food and little sleep. After seeing multiple conventional physicians for the acute asthma he’d suffered with for five years, the 32-year-old was desperate for relief. So he visited Thomas Sult, MD, a functional-medicine practitioner in New London, Minn.

As a doctor himself, Jared was inclined to be suspicious of anything that didn’t follow familiar protocols, so this was a reluctant — and last-ditch — effort to get better.