Category: Health & Wellness

I believe that there is a continuum between optimal health and disease. And what I see in my practice everyday is how different grades of sub-optimal functioning can appear at any point along it. For example, before your car’s brake pads give in and your brakes fail, years of wear and tear have been slowly eroding the pads. The same thing happens with our health. Before we develop a disease, or even symptoms, there have usually been months or years of progressive “wearing down” of optimal functioning. Our body has a large reserve, which it uses to maintain health, but it can be depleted or worn down over time. Only then do we experience disease, it doesn’t just happen out of the blue.

To use a natural metaphor, when a plant is sick or not doing well, it is crucial to look at the environment within which the plant is growing – what is the quality of the soil, is it getting enough nutrients, does it have enough sun or water, are roots or bugs from other plants impinging on its growth. This is exactly how I see our health and my role as a physician is to improve, promote and boost the bodies natural healing ability. This fosters immunity and resilience to illness, allowing us to truly blossom and experience good health.

My method is simple but effective: I remove what may be harming the body or preventing healing while at the same time replenishing it with what is needed. Unfortunately, most doctors do not see the health this way as we are trained to treat symptoms of disease as opposed to learning what keeps people healthy. We are taught crisis care medicine in hospitals and how to take care of acutely ill patients. But most of us are not sick enough to be in hospital and we have chronic conditions that are not dealt with well by this medical model. So we need to use Western Medicine wisely and appropriately, which often means looking beyond it, for solutions to our chronic and ongoing health problems.

How To Make the Most of Late Summer Produce

As the summer season slowly comes to an end (booo!), the farmers markets are full of amazing produce (yay!). Take advantage of these flavor and nutrient packed foods while they last. They require only simple preparations – a simple tomato salad with lots of fresh basil, grilled zucchinis and bell peppers tossed in olive oil or a delicious and light ‘pasta’-like dish with noodles made of zucchini tossed in lots of freshly made pesto! If you’re feeling extra frisky – why not cook up a big batch of the tasty vegetables to freeze or can to enjoy later.

How to Avoid Unnecessary Antibiotics

Did you know that…

Antibiotic abuse in the United States is widespread. We have only 4.6% of the global population but we have 46% of the global antibiotic market?
95% of clinicians prescribe antibiotics even when they are not absolutely sure they are needed?
1 in 10 doctors will write a prescription for an antibiotic even though they know it’s not needed, just because a patient asks for it?

Healthy School Lunch Ideas You Can Call Happy Meals

Although time-consuming and arguably tedious, packing a lunch for yourself or your children can be a powerful way to express your love and support and set a healthy intention for the day. At its core, preparing food for others is an act of love — and, as a parent, one of the most potent powers we possess is to support our children’s health. Embrace the chance to make the meal special, healthy and tasty and your children will feel the depth of your care for them.

Interview with Dr. Robynne Chutkan, Author of The Microbiome Solution

The microbiome refers to all the bacteria, viruses, and fungi that live in or on your body – over 100 trillion microbes, plus their genes. More than 1 billion bacteria in just one drop of fluid in your colon alone. Your unique microbial footprint develops over your lifetime, and it reflects everything about you: your parents’ health, how and where you were born, what you’ve eaten (including whether your first sips were breast milk or formula), where you’ve lived, your occupation, personal hygiene, past infections, exposure to chemicals and toxins, medications, hormone levels.

Small Diet Swaps That Will Make Big Improvements

Last week, Katrine shared her healthy snack swaps and this week, I’m giving you more with a focus on mealtime. Sugary and/or high starch foods are ubiquitous in our culture but that doesn’t make them good choices. It may seem difficult to give up our favorite foods, but, ultimately, making changes to your diet simply means creating new habits.

Are the Bugs in Your Gut Making You Fat?

We are now learning that differences in the various species of bacteria that live within the intestines actually have a profound role in regulating metabolism. For example, researchers have demonstrated that when fecal material (rich in intestinal bacteria) from an obese human is transplanted into the colon of a normal laboratory rat, the animal will gain significant amounts of weight even though its diet remains unchanged.

This Summer Grilled Peaches and Banana Ice Cream Dessert Is Divine

In the summer, it’s fun to get creative with fruit for dessert. Peaches are so delicious this time of the year. While they’re fantastic on their own, I recently threw them on the grill and added some fresh banana ice cream for the perfect summer treat!

The Heart of the Matter

Have we all been conned? In this video, Dr. Maryanne Demasi follows the road that led us to believe saturated fat and cholesterol cause heart disease and reveals why it’s been touted as the biggest myth in medical history. I know it’s an hour long, but I highly recommend watching it! The video is a special edition of Catalyst, originally aired on ABC News in Australia.

Things You May Not Know About Monsanto

A growing number of Americans are learning about Monsanto, the chemical company that has genetically engineered our food to withstand increasing doses of their chemicals, particularly the weedkiller, Roundup.