A Patient is Faced with the Cholesterol Paradox

An informative animated video of a typical interaction with a Dr after a patient gets his cholesterol results with the Dr’s automatic response being to push a Statin…EXCELLENT!!

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  • Anonymous

    Whenever I see the ads on TV for Lipitor and other drugs and then hear the side effects, it makes me wonder why anyone would assume the risk. This is a very clever way of getting the message across!

  • Celene

    This is truly excellent. The ordinary layman in the street must not be afraid to question their doctor when asked ot go on any kind of drug, especially a statin.Patients must be aware fo the side effect.s Do their doctors tell them if they want to use the statin drug, it is absolutely non negotiable and that is they have to use  COQ10 as well. – no less than 100-120grms per day.  
    I would prefer a natural lowering cholesterol formulation, but again, you have to know the ingredients of the formulation and what foods or drinks can interact with the natural formulation.
    It’s all about doing your homework, that you can go into your doctor’s consulting rooms well informed and do not be afraid to question your doctor.

  • Martist

    The Statin Effects Study, at Univ.of Calif. San Diego has been studying ill effects of statin drugs and if your life, like mine was negatively affected by statins you can join the study online.  I kept asking doctors if statins could be the cause of muscle pain, extreme fatique and memory loss, and they kept saying “No”.  I learned to be pro-active about my health, within 3 months of getting off statins, I regained muscle strength, energy and cognitive funciton.  I also continue to use CoQ10, which Canada mandates for anyone taking statins, as these drugs mess up your energy production at the mitrochondrial level THANK YOU DR. LIPMAN FOR POSTING THIS CRUCIAL INFORMATION!
     

  • Rachel N.

    Bravo Frank for including this. I have another story about the Medical Industrial complex. A friend went to his doctor for a cholesterol evaluation. He was told he had to go on Lipitor. The friend said No! Is there a natural way to lower the cholesterol? The doctor shut the door of his office and said”If I don’t prescribe Liipitor for you the insurance companies won’t pay for the visit. Then went on to suggest off the record that my friend become a vegetarian ….as close to a vegan as possible. My friend did it….and his cholesterol dropped 100 points. Then his wife did it and the same thing happened. I use red yeast rice and mine also dropped. I take Ubiquinol (the newest kind of Coq2-10 but that is for many things) as well. It’s one of the best supplements one can take of over 50.

  • Anonymous

    THIS IS A FANTASTIC!!!!! As a therapeutic yoga teacher, for the past 12 years I have been doing my own studies on muscle pain and clients who take statin drugs. There is a definite side effect in some people with sever myopathies..usually in the hip, thigh, and groin area. I had two clients this year who were in so much pain their Dr.’s thought they needed a hip replacement…NOT !!! They are smiling now…off statins … on the yoga mat… Can some-one get this on 60 mins… Love u Frank

  • AWESOME! I love how you have no fear of getting the truth out there, Dr. Lipman. Thank you! :)

  • i am an italian MD,  also in Italy   statins are hugely prescribed not only in young but also in old people……is a mad way to practice medicine….  yes it is really a lipitor paradox,

  • Ahgoo

    The low scientific level of the cholesterol hypothesis is frightening: “High levels of LDL cholesterol can slowly cause cholesterol to accumulate in the walls of the arteries that transport blood and oxygen to the heart and brain. This build-up of cholesterol may clog arteries, causing heart attack or stroke”.
    If this were true then LDL would start accumulating firstly in the capillaries, which does not happen.
    Why continue to ignoring the many studies that contradict the Cholesterol hypothesis?See the conclusions of the iconic Framingham Heart Study:
    Keaven M. Anderson, PhD; William P. Castelli, MD; Daniel Levy, MD, “Cholesterol and Mortality, 30 Years of Follow-up From the Framingham Study”. JAMA, April, 24, 1987, vol. 257, No 16. RESULTS: “There is a direct association between falling cholesterol levels over the first 14 years, and mortality over the following 18 years (11% overall and 14% CVD rate increase per 1 mg/dl per year drop in cholesterol levels)”And, recently:#”the Norwegian HUNT 2 study “jep_1767 159 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (2012) 159–168#”Low admission LDL-cholesterol is associated with increased 3-year all-cause mortality..”Cardiology Journal 2009, Vol. 16, No. 3, pp. 227–233#”Low Cholesterol is Associated With Mortality From Stroke, Heart Disease, and Cancer:The Jichi Medical School Cohort Study” J Epidemiol 2011;21(1):67-74#”Statin Therapy Decreases Myocardial Function as Evaluated Via Strain Imaging” Clin. Cardiol. 32, 12, 684–689 (2009)#”Statin-induced diabetes: perhaps, it’s the tip of the iceberg” QJM Advance Access published November 30, 2010and many others. specially this one Lipid levels in patients hospitalized with coronary artery disease: An analysis of 136,905 hospitalizations in Get With The Guidelines” (Am Heart J 2009;157:111-7.e2.). Look at the results:“In a large cohort of patients hospitalized with CAD, almost half ) have admission LDL 130 mg/dL. The LDL levels <70 mg/dL are observed in only 17.6% of patients. Admission HDL levels are <40mg/dL in 54.6% of patients hospitalized with CAD, whereas <10% of patients have admission HDL levels ≥60 mg/dL.Said another way: More than 75% of CAD patients had LDL <130 mg/dL (!!!!!!???????)

  • Rjhalverson

    it just amazes me how blind people are to the actual facts presented here, what will it take to get doctors to advise people what is best for them,                       NOT FOR BUSINESS!!!!

  • hunter

    Had a heart attack, placed on 40 mg of zokor simvastatin? no adverse reaction for 3 years, 4th year extreme leg muscle weakness, then pain, growing to excrutiating pain in all muscels below the waist. placed on tylenol 3 to minimize the discomfort, went back to doctor, requesting we find the cause of pain, after a multitude of tests, the neurologist suggested the pain may be caused by my cholesterol lowering medication, took this report to my cardiologist, he lowered my dosage from 40mg. per day, to 20mg. per day! I stopped the tylenol to better monitor any change, within 2 weeks, all pain stopped. the weakness continues, I feel the muscle damage may be permanent.
    I have determined that the medication being prescribed in an incremental format would be effective, while lowering the possibility of problems related to indiscriminate dosages, 40mg. -50mg. and higher, that lead to much more serious medical problems

  • hunter

    I entered hospital with Stroke, they said my cholesterol was high, and placing me on Cholesterol lowering drugs, 50 m.g. per day, while beginning stroke recovery therapy, able to do 3 sets of 10 standing up from a sitting position, at the end of 30 day therapy, struggling to do 2 sets of 5 standups from a sitting position. two new statin drugs I determined were the cause. Indiscriminate Dosageformat,
    they seem like kids with a radio, “loud is good-Louder is better”

  • hunter

    I watched a show many years ago, that indicated that there were families in France, and Italy, that had Extremely High levels of Cholesterol in their blood, with no cardiovascular issues, it was determined that their cholesterol was slippery, and not sticky like most. It should be now possible to find out from their genetic code, what gene caused the cholesterol to be slippery!
    If we found this out, gene therapy would eliminate most concerns,as the high level of cholesterol would not have the alarm it has today, as it would be slippery, and not form plaque, on the walls of arteries.