Author: Britta Aragon

15 Ways to Protect Yourself from Excess Estrogen

Estrogen is a type of hormone that promotes female development and characteristics in the body. It is produced mostly in the ovaries as well as in fat cells, and helps regulate the menstrual cycle and reproductive system. It also helps promote healthy bones and is involved in blood clotting to help prevent excessive bleeding.

Regular Tap Water Can Damage Your Skin Over Time

A number of studies have shown us that our tap water can be contaminated with chemicals. What are these chemicals doing to your skin?

You splash it on to rinse your face, but you also spend hours a week showering and bathing in it. Over a period of years, your skin could be exposed to a lot of chemicals simply because you wash regularly.

Is there a way to protect yourself, outside of investing a mint into distilled water? Fortunately, there is.

7 Skin Care Ingredients That Sound Toxic But Are Actually Safe and Clean

We’ve come a long way in the skin care industry. We now know that a lot of the chemical ingredients we’ve used for decades can be harsh, damaging, and sometimes even toxic. We’re turning to more natural, plant-sourced ingredients that truly nourish and protect skin without the potential side effects.

Sometimes we can go overboard in our zeal for what’s “natural,” though, and end up avoiding ingredients that are actually beneficial to skin.

Naturally Shield Your Skin From the Sun With Food

A safe sunscreen (like zinc oxide) is your best bet when it comes to protecting your skin from harmful UV rays. But did you know that you can increase your skin’s resistance to damage, aging, and even cancer with certain healthy foods?

Plants have their own built-in protection against the damaging effects of the sun.

Pollution and Aging: 5 Ways to Counteract Pollution-Induced Skin Damage

You know pollution isn’t good for you. Scientists have connected it with respiratory problems, birth defects, cancer, and more.

But did you know that your exposure to pollution could also make you look older?

In 2010, the Journal of Investigative Dermatology published a landmark study connecting pollution to skin aging. Researchers examined 400 Caucasian women aged 70 to 80 years, and gave them scores based on how much their skin had aged.

10 Ways a Humidifier Improves Your Health, Skin, and Household This Winter

Winter air is dry air. Humidifiers put moisture back into the air, which can create a lot of benefits for you and your family.

A 2013 study, for example, showed that increasing humidity levels to 43 percent or above significantly reduced the ability of airborne viruses to cause flu infections. In fact, in a low humidity environment, 70-77 percent of viruses could transmit the disease through coughs, but when humidity was increased to 43 percent or more, that number dropped to only 14 percent.

Avoid These 7 Mistakes to Maintain Glowing Skin This Winter

Dry, winter air can wreak havoc on skin. Not only does it steal moisture away, it can lead to tiny cracks in the surface, lowering skin’s ability to protect against free radical damage. In fact, if you’re not careful, you can suffer accelerated aging over the winter months.

With a few changes to your skin care routine, you can avoid the damage and keep your skin looking healthy and vibrant during these winter months. Avoid these seven mistakes, and step up your nourishing and moisturizing care.

Stress Ages Your Skin—Tips to Keep that Youthful Glow

We all know that too much stress is bad for our health. A 2012 study, for example, found that stress increases risk of depression, heart disease and infectious diseases, and increases inflammation throughout the body—which, by the way, increases skin aging, as well.

When we’re stressed, we’re also less likely to eat right, get enough sleep, or stick with our exercise routines. That affects our overall health, but also our appearance. The skin fails to get the nutrients it needs to repair itself. You can tell by that inconvenient acne eruption or psoriasis flare up.

How to Care for Red, Sensitive Skin

The American Academy of Dermatology says that sensitive skin affects millions of people, causing uncomfortable and embarrassing issues. A 2011 study found that out of 994 subjects questioned, nearly 45 percent declared having sensitive or very sensitive skin. Troublesome symptoms included dryness, combination skin, dermatological disorders, and higher skin reactivity to cosmetics and environmental factors.