4 Ways to Build Muscle No Matter Your Age

Building Muscle

One of my older buddies, a 74-year-old, fitness-conscious fellow, when asked how he’s doing, often responds, “I’m keeping it tight,” which always gives people a laugh. Amusing as it is to hear the phrase coming out of a septuagenarian’s mouth, his goal of keeping trim, with as much muscle as possible, is a serious one – and one we all should shoot for, no matter what age we are.

The challenge with muscle mass is that after the age of 40, it starts to decline at roughly 1% a year. At 50, the decline picks up additional speed (yikes!). So, if you’re not starting with a lot of muscle to begin with, it’s easy to see how by the time you hit my buddy’s age, you may have lost as much as 50% or more of your muscle mass. Pretty alarming, eh? Though it certainly explains why Granny needs help carrying the groceries.

On the upside though, while Gran’s got her challenges, you’ve still got time to slow the muscle mass slide and even build muscle mass, and, as my buddy says, “keep it tight” for years to come. Here are a few steps to take right now:

1. Don’t just stand there – move it, lift it, work it.

Need one more reason to workout? To maintain muscle mass, exercise is job #1. To stave off sarcopenia, the age-related muscular deterioration that’s the muscular equivalent of osteoporosis, the best approach is a two-pronged exercise routine. Alternate resistance training to build and strengthen muscles, with aerobic work to increase blood flow to the capillaries, bringing more oxygen to the muscles and building endurance. If you’ve been out of the fitness loop for a while, consider hiring a trainer to develop a customized program for you and to help guide you through your workouts – but clear it with your doc before getting started. Make sure the trainer you choose has experience training the 40+ set, to help minimize your risk of injury from doing too much, too soon. You can also check out our Pinterest page for more great exercise ideas. Once you’re looking and feeling fit – don’t quit – this is a life-long commitment.

2. Eat protein, particularly if you’re getting on in years.

Though the perfect amount of high-quality protein you need to eat daily in order to maintain long-term muscle mass hasn’t been definitively established, you can roughly estimate your daily requirements based on the following equation: Take your body weight, divide it in half, subtract 10. The resulting number will give you the approximate amount of protein you should be eating every day. So, for example, if you weigh 160 lbs, then half of that is 80, minus 10 = 70 grams of protein spread over the course a day’s worth of meals. In short, to slow muscle deterioration, particularly for those heading into their 60’s and beyond, high-quality protein is your best weapon. NOTE: If you have renal issues, you should work with your doctor to determine an appropriate daily protein intake for you specific needs.

3. Make your protein count.

If you are going to eat meat, make sure it is grass fed beef or organic chicken. And if you eat eggs, look for organic pasture raised or free range eggs. While meat and poultry are helpful in building muscle, you can also get high-quality protein from non-meat sources. A few good sources of non-meat proteins include organic white beans, black beans, chickpeas, lentils and even leafy greens like kale, spinach, broccoli and asparagus. But my favorite source of protein for building muscle mass is Whey Protein from grass fed cows.  If you want to get a jump on your protein needs first thing in the morning, include one scoop of Be Well Whey Protein powder in your smoothie to add 24 grams of protein to your breakfast.

4. Supplement your strength.

While I believe you should get the majority of your nutrition from fresh, organic, non-GM veggies, grass fed meats, organic chicken and eggs, some legumes and some fruits, supplementation is an excellent way to support overall health and fill in the nutritional gaps, in middle age and even more so for older adults who may not be eating enough of the right foods. Among the supplements that have shown promise in preserving and supporting muscle mass, topping the list are Omega-3fatty acids; Vitamin D; L carnitine; Glutamine and B12/folic acid.

Bottom line: Consistent, strength training and aerobic exercise, smart dietary choices and strategic supplementation – they’re your ticket to a strong, healthy body – so the sooner you climb aboard, the better!

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  • cyndi lee

    Hi Frank, Can you recommend a protein powder that does not have any legumes in it? The ones with peas and beans upset my tummy. Thanks, Cyndi

  • Anonymous

    Hi Cyndi,
    Whey protein is a great and derived from dairy. The Be Well whey is from grass-fed cows and minimally processed!
    You can try Recharge, which also has some added greens poder to it: http://www.bewellbydrfranklipman.com/products/recharge.html

    Or just plain Whey: http://www.bewellbydrfranklipman.com/products/supplements/whey-protein.html

    All my best,
    Katrine – Be Well Team

  • Jeff Sommers

    Exercising and maintaing muscle mass as you get older has many benefits.
    Exercise converts some bad cholesterol into good cholesterol
    Exercise improves bone density and guards against osteoporosis.
    Exercise improves fitness and makes daily activity a breeze……just to name a few

  • Theresa

    Hi Frank,
    I’m a 58 year old woman who weightlifts (interval training) 3 to 4 times a week. I’m also vegan. I take in 100 grams of protein a day through diet and protein powder supplementation. I can’t seem to gain muscle even with the added protein powder. I’m very aware of where to get protein in a vegan diet, but I’m disappointed that I’m not gaining muscle. Any suggestions? You mentioned incorporating aerobic exercise. I can do that too, but do you have any other suggestions on
    gaining muscle at my age?

  • Anonymous

    Hi Theresa,

    While are our top tips are listed in this article, here are some additional things to consider:

    1. Is your protein powder high quality? make sure there are no added sugars.
    2. Vegans tend to eat a lot of grains since it helps fill them up — if this is the case for you, you may want to consider cutting back. We find that the older we get, the more carbohydrate sensitive many individuals are.

    And yes, adding in aerobic exercise sounds great!

    Be Well,
    ~ Jackie, Be Well Health Coach

  • Vicki Cryer

    Hemp protein Powder is great

  • Greg

    I tried to follow you and read your pintrest page but got blocked because I’m not signed up or signed in. I’m done with joining social media. We have way to much exclusiveness in this country.

  • Anonymous

    Very good article. What do you think of supplementing creatine? http://oldspartanfitness.com/gaining-muscle-mass-after-50/

  • Anonymous

    good article. recent studies have shown glutamine supplementation to be worthless. Like the focus on weight training. http://oldspartanfitness.com/building-muscle-over-50/

  • Debbie Hines
  • Rambo71

    Hi, I am 71 and have been weight training since 12 years old . I am springing leaks but I will be a bodybuilder til the day I die!

  • steve

    i’m 60 yrs old, with part of a lung removed, i still train at the gym and have good muscle tone, i find” bob’s red mill protein” excellent, it’s only protein , no added fats, sugars, gums etc. i eat canned tuna and sardines, low fat milk and greek yoghurt, lots of black beans and chick peas (hummus), as much fish as i can get hold of….but never any meat or chicken or highly processed or junk foods…..i feel great and am still as strong as most 25 yr olds of today…..i really do recommend bobs red mill protein….try a few scoops in a banana shake with a spoon each of flax seed meal and oat meal…..life is short but it’s wide!!

  • Jim

    I am 68 and have been doing P90 x for several years. I can’t seem to build muscle. I take protein shakes and eat plenty of protein. I have looked up numerous articles on the topic of muscle retention in the elderly but nothing seems to help any suggestions.

  • Mala-Guido Naidoo Nucibella

    Hi Frank, my dad is 85 and has just been diagnosed with really low muscle mass in his legs after complaining his legs are really weak. He used to be fit up until 18 months ago when he suddenly stopped going for his hourly walks. How do you suggest we start rebuilding his muscle mass? He is prepared to start walking everyday but for how long? and should he do it twice a day & build up to more weekly? he is a small eater – how should we get him eating more? He enjoys a healthy glass of whisky a day but has been too sedentary and quite the couch potato and hates drinking water so should he give this up? Is there any supplements you suggest? He does not really enjoy meat either. Your advice would be greatly appreciated. Looking forward to hearing back from you. Thanks

  • joie

    Hi teresa. I just read an article that was talking about a little known problem some women face and it’s called low testosterone. Maybe you should go to your doctor and have him do a bloodwork panel that’s going to really check your testosterone and estrogen levels to see if they’re dipping and you need a supplement. do some research I’m sure you will find lots of information I believe the supplement the doctor gives in this case would be 5 milligrams of DHEA.

  • Jacob Emerson

    Great stuff Frank! Remember if you want to build muscle then you have to start by watching your diet, you can’t just expect to lift a bunch of weights and build muscle if your diet sucks. Lifting weights is easy, but cutting out junk food can be tough. When you get your diet in check, then focus on lifting heavy and hard. The most important thing is being consistent and keeping a log and a good routine going. You won’t get very far if you’re inconsistent in this game. Start off by doing big compound movements, such as squats, pull ups, dead lifts and such. I know it’s tough for a lot of folks to find a good routine to keep them going but it’s vital that you do this, I’ve made some amazing gains in just a few months thanks to the advice I got over at aestheticreview.com this guy really helped me get a great program going that allows me to keep track of my weight and gains using a really neat tool, as well as an awesome routine. Anyways good luck and never give up on your journey to making big gains!

  • Jacob Emerson

    Great stuff Frank! Remember if you want to build muscle then you have to start by watching your diet, you can’t just expect to lift a bunch of weights and build muscle if your diet sucks. Lifting weights is easy, but cutting out junk food can be tough. When you get your diet in check, then focus on lifting heavy and hard. The most important thing is being consistent and keeping a log and a good routine going. You won’t get very far if you’re inconsistent in this game. Start off by doing big compound movements, such as squats, pull ups, dead lifts and such. I know it’s tough for a lot of folks to find a good routine to keep them going but it’s vital that you do this, I’ve made some amazing gains in just a few months thanks to the advice I got over at aestheticreview.com this guy really helped me get a great program going that allows me to keep track of my weight and gains using a really neat tool, as well as an awesome routine. Anyways good luck and never give up on your journey to making big gains!

  • Jacob Emerson

    Great stuff Frank! Remember if you want to build muscle then you have to start by watching your diet, you can’t just expect to lift a bunch of weights and build muscle if your diet sucks. Lifting weights is easy, but cutting out junk food can be tough. When you get your diet in check, then focus on lifting heavy and hard. The most important thing is being consistent and keeping a log and a good routine going. You won’t get very far if you’re inconsistent in this game. Start off by doing big compound movements, such as squats, pull ups, dead lifts and such. I know it’s tough for a lot of folks to find a good routine to keep them going but it’s vital that you do this, I’ve made some amazing gains in just a few months thanks to the advice I got over at aestheticreview.com this guy really helped me get a great program going that allows me to keep track of my weight and gains using a really neat tool, as well as an awesome routine. Anyways good luck and never give up on your journey to making big gains!

  • Jacob Emerson

    Great stuff Frank! Remember if you want to build muscle then you have to start by watching your diet, you can’t just expect to lift a bunch of weights and build muscle if your diet sucks. Lifting weights is easy, but cutting out junk food can be tough. When you get your diet in check, then focus on lifting heavy and hard. The most important thing is being consistent and keeping a log and a good routine going. You won’t get very far if you’re inconsistent in this game. Start off by doing big compound movements, such as squats, pull ups, dead lifts and such. I know it’s tough for a lot of folks to find a good routine to keep them going but it’s vital that you do this, I’ve made some amazing gains in just a few months thanks to the advice I got over at aestheticreview.com this guy really helped me get a great program going that allows me to keep track of my weight and gains using a really neat tool, as well as an awesome routine. Anyways good luck and never give up on your journey to making big gains!

  • Jacob Emerson

    Great stuff Frank! Remember if you want to build muscle then you have to start by watching your diet, you can’t just expect to lift a bunch of weights and build muscle if your diet sucks. Lifting weights is easy, but cutting out junk food can be tough. When you get your diet in check, then focus on lifting heavy and hard. The most important thing is being consistent and keeping a log and a good routine going. You won’t get very far if you’re inconsistent in this game. Start off by doing big compound movements, such as squats, pull ups, dead lifts and such. I know it’s tough for a lot of folks to find a good routine to keep them going but it’s vital that you do this, I’ve made some amazing gains in just a few months thanks to the advice I got over at aestheticreview.com this guy really helped me get a great program going that allows me to keep track of my weight and gains using a really neat tool, as well as an awesome routine. Anyways good luck and never give up on your journey to making big gains!

  • Carol

    My naturopath told me to increase meat intake stop taking LCarnitine less fruit thank you for your article it makes mire sense I am 74 female rebound daily still mow my lawns, I came away from the appointment thinking with bad thoughts of giving up my programme but your article has set me right.

  • Dan

    Some more tips that i’d like to add:

    1. Know the number of calories you need to grow bigger

    Your calorie needs depend on your age, gender, current weight and how active your lifestyle is. For the sake of simplicity, multiply your current weight in pounds to 20. If you weigh 130 pounds, that’s 130 x20 = 2600 calories daily. This might come as a shock if you’re not used to eating that much in a day.

    2. Exercise big muscle groups to jumpstart the muscle building process

    Studies show that training big muscle groups jumpstarts the muscle building process leading to faster and bigger muscle gains. Make sure you involve these muscle groups at least once a week. The largest muscle groups are the leg, back and chest muscles.

    3. Lift progressively

    As your muscles get used to the heavy load, you may need to shock it by constantly changing the weight you lift. If you used 100 pounds on your bench press during your first week of training, try to add 10 pounds for the second week. Add another 10 pounds on the following week and so on. The same goes for other body parts.

    Progressive lifting makes sure that your muscles don’t get complacent and stop growing. The additional weight tells your body to grow more muscle fibers to keep up with the load. Watch yourself get bigger and stronger every week.

    4. if you’re just starting out or are looking to try a new routine, then try a proven workout program. B e careful though there are a lot of cons out there a good site that has in depth reviews on a number of workout programs is http://workoutprogramreview.com/

    5. Alter your exercise routine

    If you’re working out three times a day training two body parts, try to spread it to six days working only on one body part per day. If you’re doing chest and biceps on Mondays and back and triceps on Wednesdays, make it chest and triceps then back and biceps. This puts more stress on the common muscle groups (biceps and triceps) forcing your body to grow more muscle fibers.

  • Oh_The_Huge_Manatee

    You need to lift as heavy as possible, so heavy you can only do 3 – 5 reps. Once you can do more than 5 reps, increase your weights. Do three sets of 5 reps at heavy weight for all exercises. Use Optimum Nutrition gold standard whey protein. You need complete (animal) protein. If you do all this, then you will probably gain muscle within 4 months, three times per week. It worked for me. I’m 52, 160 lb. male and I eat 140 g protein/day. Good luck!

  • Rose

    She’s VEGAN so she can’t get protein from animal sources.

  • Rose

    This is good info. I believe I am low in testosterone too since I have little body hair. I believe that is a symptom.

  • Igo Pavlov

    I am 47. Anyhow, In my view all you need to do is to slow down your reps first. Maybe do 4 – 5, but do them slow so that you count to 4 to lift and 4 to bring the wieight down. Breathe inhaling and exhaling taking a bit more air than usual. Right after the excercise walk in the fresh air. Continue taking proteins but drink it slower. Really – like a 1/4 of the full shake per 2 or 3 minutes. Do that and mass would start to build in a week.

  • IIlI

    hehe. rambo name suits ya right! :D

  • David

    bytheway age is no metter for build muscles you just try Sunestron and this is the only best way to build muscles fast and naturally.

  • silverfox47

    I am a 68 yo man who loves working out..its my legal drug high. I eat meat, and try eating clean..oops, I enjoy my jack daniels, wine. I want gain muscle but realize at my age its a slower process. Ideas? I lift heavy for 6 reps after I warm up, but what is defined now as a warm up.

  • oldbiker1

    She has a choice… vegan or muscle gain. At 75 I’ll take muscle gain — that will give me more time than the vegan diet. Life is all about choices… right? Although, there are no guarantees. It’s really hard to know which way to go since we’re dealing with opinions. There is science to back up every opinion. But, I like muscles more than vegan, so that’s my choice.

  • Jayman

    you’re a woman, that’s why. You don’t have the balls for that.

  • Bob

    Need a step by step exercise cardio program for a sixty year old man any suggestions on where to look

  • Thomas Ktwentyone

    Frank, good advice in general, but why inject speculative pseudo-science like “organic, free range, non-GM”? I can guarantee you that these 3 factors have near zero impact. Eat protein and lift as heavy as you can, that’s what matters.

  • Thomas Ktwentyone

    Aerobics are counterproductive to muscle gain. Just hit the weights hard, 3 sets of 6-10 reps with as much weight as you can handle. That’ll get you as big as you can become. After that, look up Anavar, that’ll get you further. Also, try to eat fish at least, a pure vegan diet isn’t healthy. All amino acids aren’t the same, we’re meant to eat a variety of protein sources.

  • Linda Bonsignore

    Had dental implants two weeks ago was told I could finally go back to the gym however told to stay away from weights still am getting annoyed frustrated and even more annoyed worried about losing muscle I am 52 and once you are over 50 it is hard to regain muscle like a 20 year old Any suggestions please?

  • Linda Bonsignore

    Hi my name is Linda I am 52 is 50 or 60 grams of protein enough or should I increase?

  • Oh_The_Huge_Manatee

    “If It Fits Your Macros” IIFYM.com Macro nutrients to consider (macros) are protein, fat, carbs and fiber. Use this calculator to figure out what you need for macros. Hit your macros every day. http://www.iifym.com/iifym-calculator/ Use that to fill in the calculator, figure out your TDEE (Total Daily Energy Expenditure). Then, continue even lower on the page to get your macros. Here is where you need to decide if you are cutting (losing weight) maintaining or bulking (gaining weight) Unless you are a body builder or need to gain weight, choose either maintain or a very slight cut, as you can’t build many muscles if you are losing weight. Your macro for protein probably should be somewhere around .8 grams per pound of body weight. Lift as heavy as you can without hurting yourself. Study Youtube videos for form or get a trainer. don’t be afraid of getting “too muscley”, as women (or men) don’t just get that way without extreme low body fat and usually steroids. Don’t listen to anyone who says “don’t lift “heavy” I just want to be toned so I lift lighter weights. this is complete bunk. good luck!

  • laurakraber

    Hi Linda,
    There are differing views on how much protein is required and no hard and fast rules on the subject. Generally speaking, 50-60 grams per day is more than adequate. Best of luck with your health.

  • laurakraber

    Keep up the exercise and movement and speak to a trainer or physical therapist for some tips during your recovery period.

  • Billy Boy

    I know this post is old, but I’ll throw in my 2 cents in case someone else comes across this and is in a similar situation. I think 100 grams of protein is more than enough, as long as you’re getting an adequate amount of total calories. I believe the main problem here is doing your weight lifting as interval training. The muscles need to be stressed and exhausted enough to make your body feel that it needs to add muscle to relieve future stress and help keep you alive. If you’re dong interval training, you’re probably getting out of breath before your muscles get stressed enough. That’s great for your cardiovascular system and getting generally fit, but it’s not the optimal way to specifically build muscle. And try to do your workouts under fairly cool conditions. You don’t want sets to end because your out of breath or because you’re getting hot. You want them to end because your muscles are exhausted. Doesn’t mean you have to lift to failure necessarily, but pretty close to it. You don’t have to go so heavy that you can only do 3 to 5 reps, or even 6 to 10, like some other people have suggested. In fact, someone in their 50s needs to be a lot more careful about lifting in the low rep ranges to protect joints. There’s no reason 10-15 reps can’t build muscle just as well as 3-5 reps, as long as the muscle is worked hard enough to force a change.

  • Steve

    I’m 55 and after a layoff of a few years I’ve resumed training. In 2 months I’ve lost 3″ on my waist and down to a 31″ waist. I’ve also put on quite a bit of muscle and don’t look anything like I did a few months ago. That said I trained for about 25 years before laying off at age 51. I also run 3 miles per day.

    My training has much less volume now. I do a couple of exercises for each muscle group with 3 sets of 6-10 reps. I split my muscle groups up too and train 4x per week. I do a lot of compound lifts and focus on the bigger muscle groups. My diet is high in protein and low in sugars. It’s all been easy to maintain and this formula works great for me.

  • Denise Lardot

    My husband is trying Sunestron to lose weight and frequently goes to the gym. Since taking Sunestron supplement, he has built up more muscle faster!

  • Tom

    I’m 72 years old and still train like I did 20 years ago 1 bodypart a day 20 to 30 sets.60 seconds rest per set.4 or 5 set per exercise.lots of super sets,drop sets etc.keep the body guessing. Reps from 12 down to 6 or 4.Where ever your mind is at is where your body will be. I’m 5 foot 8 inches 165 pounds.I eat about 1800 calories a day.Protien about 100 grams.No supplements,just good food.Never Quit , Never Surrender :)

  • Verna Pycraft

    Hey Tom, loved your post. I will be 60 in August. I do international style ballroom. I don’t seem to have a problem building and retaining muscle, but I do have a problem with what seems to be constant shortening of my leg muscles. I go for physio every two weeks for a sports massage to loosen muscles and that works. I work out 3 t0 4-and-a-half hours per week (high stress cardio) and walk the dog every other day for 30 mins, about 2 hrs a week. I also work full time as a teacher. Any ideas anyone?

  • Louise Krekic

    her problem is that she is a vegan and humans are omnivores, so we have to eat meat, it’s not just protein we need meat and all that it has in it. She may have also started late. I started at 45 to go to the gym regularly, I work hard physically on our property also, and have very strong muscles and bones. I am short and strong. I fell a few times o concrete and didn’t break a bone or even injure the joints, and I am 68.

  • Nasim

    Hi Frank
    I am 58 years male. Can you please advise me to gain my muscles?
    Nasim

  • Monique Monique

    Little body hair . . . Lucky you. :/

  • markdouglas

    Love this but he should have told you, BE CAREFUL WHAT PROTEIN. Protein from meat, chicken, fish, organic or not, range fed or not, can really damage your kidneys, especially at this age, As you will see if you check the science in the articles below, plant based protein does NOT cause that kind of damage. So there is no earthly reason you must eat meat or eggs or dairy for this, and some good reasons to get that protein from plants. If you have any problem whatsoever. don’t risk it without learning. , Look at the science. Science does not care how confident you are when telling BS — so many of these guys are so sure of themselves, they just spout stuff, repeat other BS. Hold the phone on this one, your kidneys are too important. See what I mean. . http://nutritionfacts.org/video/which-type-of-protein-is-better-for-our-kidneys/

  • markdouglas

    Maybe its not protein issue, you get good protein, I assume, from plants. You also do far less damage to your kidneys, a BFD as you get older. A real BFD.

    Hormones are another story. You also need the HORMONES to build muscle mass. I would not mess with that, myself, but to each his own. Maybe check nutrition facts dot org for hormones like I did for kidneys. Knowledge is power. Congrats on being vegan — I call it plant based. Not sure its exactly same thing

  • Claire

    Yes I Am 72 yrs old and I will take muscle.

  • Steven Parke

    Not true. There are competition body builders that are vegan.

  • Steven Parke

    Wrong. There are competitive bodybuilders that are vegan. The routine is muscle building counter productive.

  • Mustapha Gp

    I really liked this article because it makes easy the way to have a healthy muscles.
    http://www.fitnessdiet.ml/2016/06/title_10.html

  • xxxscimitarxxx

    Sustanon 250 ew……

  • xxxscimitarxxx

    Sustanon 250 ew……eat everything….LIFT!….repeat.

  • xxxscimitarxxx

    sustanon 250 ew

  • TheBlues

    I am 72 and will take muscle. I eat 4 Jumbo eggs daily and work out with “the Block”. Each block weighs 45 lbs. I am working the weight up and stressing the muscles as much as is possible, to failure. I started on June 21 this year. Hopefully I will see some growth. Also, I eat cottage cheese, sour cream and hard cheeses. C’mon muscles, I don’t have much time left.

  • TheBlues

    I had my Doc check my testosterone as my wife was calling me “Mr. Grumpy”. So, later, the Doc told me my “T” is normal. OK. I left and about a week later I thought, yeah, normal for a 72 year old guy, which is virtually nil. Crap is all I can say.

  • TheBlues

    Have you had any muscle growth?

  • Amanda LaPlante

    Love the article, but I have methylation issues, like many people, and was disheartened to see folic acid recommended instead of folate.

  • Bart Burroughs

    Great advice except for the “you should buy expensive organic foods” part. Organic is fine if you have the extra money and want to buy it but I have never seen any double blind, peer reviewed study that suggested the protein in grass fed beef is any higher quality than the protein in grain fed beef or that organic anything is “better” than non-organic traditionally grown produce. So thanks for the information but I will choose traditional products over the more expensive organic.

  • David Eichenberg

    Sure there are but it is much more difficult to build muscle as a vegan. Look at a vegan bodybuilder compared to one who eats meat. They are night and day. The very successful ones were also not vegan as they were building their bulk. They became vegan after they had already obtain a great deal of muscle mass. All proteins are not equal.

  • Steven Parke

    ok. So what about this guy as an example. Vegetarian since birth. I guess it depends on what you mean by bulk. There is point where it’s ridiculous. Point is you can, in fact, build muscle on a vegan diet.
    http://www.greatveganathletes.com/torre-washington-vegan-bodybuilder

  • USCGMKCvet

    If you are over 50, the most important thing you can do is use proper form. Focus on the targeted muscle group during the lift. Your goal is to not injure yourself, because it takes much longer to recover at this age. I’m 55 and still lifting. For me, hitting the gym before work is as much of a habit as brushing my teeth. You have to like it, or you’ll never stick with it. Even if you can’t gain muscle mass (every one is different), you will at the very least prevent muscle loss and deterioration. Good Luck!

  • David Eichenberg

    Sure you can. I am not saying you can’t. I am saying it is a lot easier to build it on a diet that includes meat. Unless, you are also juicing (real juicing not talking about enhancement drugs) it is next to impossible to get enough L-Glutamine (and other BCAA’s) in your diet. I guess you could eat tons of cabbage or beets if you really really like cabbage and beets.:-) A supplement for L-Glutamine is out of the question I would think for a true vegan. Since the supplements are derived from animal products. Supplements are also no replacement for the actual food source. There are many more beneficial things happening in the gut while it breaks down real food sources than when a supplement is taken.

  • Turhan Halebic

    I bought Sunestron for my husband as he has been needing a bit of help during working out as he’s been getting older. sunestron has helped him tremendously by increasing his energy levels, which in turn has helped his workouts become much more efficient. He has noticed that he is able to use heavier weights for more reps. He’s really looking forward to the long term results of this supplement.

  • JD

    Having the Energy to Exercise is another problem i think ,at least for me,i’ve been bodybuilding all my life since 13 years of age, and at 55 i started to seriously wane off heavy exercise,instead i bike or walk now…. At 66 i still lift light weights when the body feels somewhat energized…My Message is do what you can for exercise, it all helps, and eat healthy food for the best possible outcome.

  • Stavros Tosounidis

    I’m currently on a Ketogenic diet that is essentially a high fat, moderate protein and virtually invisible carb eating plan. Lots of salad though. was wondering if anyone had a real life example on how this type of diet affects gaining muscle mass over the long run.
    http://musclemassgain.net A blog i’m starting Thank you kindly

  • Min Anita E Lewis

    Im 62 n jus starting any advice…arthritis joint pain n fybromyalgia

  • Min Anita E Lewis

    Im 62 n qanna start getting bac n shape i hv joint pain ftbeomyalgua n arthritis…but i hv to try n beat all this …pls ant advice